Biographies of 2019 Lecturers

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image courtesy of Sabrina Jedlicka, Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering

2019 Class Lecturers

Daniel Babcock, Ph.D.
Daniel Babcock, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
The Babcock Lab's research is on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying degeneration of synapses in neurodegenerative diseases.
Robert Buckheit, Ph.D.
Robert Buckheit, Ph.D., 2009
ImQuesti BioSciences
Dr. Buckheit is Director of Business Development and Manager of Immunology and the Flow Cytometry Services Program at ImQuest BioSciences in Frederick, MD.
R. Michael Burger, Ph.D.
R. Michael Burger, Ph.D.
Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Burger’s research focuses on the neurobiology of hearing with an emphasis on electrophysiological techniques. The objectives of his work include resolving the synaptic and systems level function of auditory brain circuitry.
Lynne Cassimeris, Ph.D.
Lynne Cassimeris, Ph.D.
Professor
Dr. Cassimeris lab focuses on mechanisms of cell growth and cell division and the role that components of the cells internal skeleton play in these processes.
Xuanhong Cheng, Ph.D.
Xuanhong Cheng, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
Dr. Cheng has a long-standing interest in developing and applying engineering tools, including micro/nanotechnology, chemical and electrical approaches to study biological problems, especially those related to whole cells.
Lesley Chow, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
Dr. Chow’s research interests include the design of multifunctional and hierarchically organized biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Ann Fink, Ph.D.
Ann Fink, Ph.D.
Professor of Practice, Biological Sciences
Dr. Fink is a neuroscientist with an interest in physiological mechanisms of memory and emotion. Her research has focused on how the relationship between adverse life experiences interacts with gender socialization to predict health outcomes.
Santiago Herrera, Ph.D.
Professor of Practice, Biological Sciences
Dr. Herrera's research uses an interdisciplinary approach to study the ecological and evolutionary processes that produce the biodiversity patterns in the ocean.
Graham Hatfull, Ph.D.
Graham Hatfull, Ph.D.
Professor, University of Pittsburgh
Dr. Hatfull is interested in the molecular genetics of the mycobacteria and their bacteriophages. He and his lab members study the mysteries about gene function, regulation, and evolutionary mechanisms of these mycobacteriophages.
Katie Hoffman, Ph.D.
Katie Hoffman, Ph.D.
Professor of Practice, Biological Sciences
Dr. Hoffman's research interests focus on the cellular basis of information processing in the brain and she has published her work in journals focusing on toxicology and neuropharmacology.
M. Kathryn Iovine, PhD.
M. Kathryn Iovine, Ph.D.
Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Iovine’s lab focuses on a central question in developmental biology – how do animals regulate the size of tissues? Her lab uses the zebrafish fin as a model system to study the regulation of growth, or how organs/limbs achieve the correct size.
Michael Kuchka, Ph.D.
Michael Kuchka, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Kuchka’s research has focused on the regulation of expression of chloroplast genes as well as interactions between the nucleus and chloroplast. His laboratory is now focusing on genes involved in several metabolic pathways.
Michael Layden, Ph.D.
Michael Layden, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Layden studies neural development and neural regeneration in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. His seeks to understand the mechanisms that regulate how neural regeneration occurs.
Daniel Lopresti, Ph.D.
Daniel Lopresti, Ph.D.
Professor, Computer Science and Engineering
Dr. Lopresti's work focuses on fundamental algorithmic and systems-related questions in pattern recognition, with applications in bioinformatics, document analysis, and computer security.
Linda Lowe-Krentz, Ph.D.
Linda Lowe-Krentz, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair, Biological Sciences
Dr. Lowe-Krent'z research is focused on signal transduction and wound repair in the vascular system.
Julie Miwa, Ph.D.
Julie Miwa, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Miwa’s research focuses on the genetics of learning and behavioral plasticity in the brain. Her work examines what changes occur in our brain to alter learning potential as we age.
Amber Rice, Ph.D.
Amber Rice, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
As an evolutionary biologist, Dr. Rice has focused her research interests on the genetics of ecological speciation and hybridization using population genetic and genomics approaches.
Lorenzo Servitje, Ph.D.
Lorenzo Servitje, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, English
Dr. Servitje holds a dual appointment in the in the English Department and Health, Medicine, and Society Program. One of his scholarly interests includes the contagion theory.
Neal Simon, Ph.D.
Neal Simon, Ph.D.
Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Simon's research is in behavioral neurobiology. His research in drug development, hormone-neurotransmitter interactions and behavioral regulation.
Joshua Slee, Ph.D.
Joshua Slee, Ph.D., G2013
Assistant Professor, DeSales University
Dr. Slee’s primary research interest is in the human inflammatory response. As a cell and molecular biologist, he studies how vascular cells transmit and respond to inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signals from their environment.
Damien Thévenin, Ph.D.
Damien Thévenin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Chemistry
Dr. Thévenin’s research focuses on two primary areas: Developing novel therapeutics to target and eradicate cancer cells, and investigations of cellular communication through membrane receptor signaling across cell membranes.
Vassie Ware, Ph.D.
Vassie Ware, Ph.D.
Professor, Biological Sciences
Research in the Ware lab is focused in two areas: 1) the role of specialized ribosomes in ribosome-mediated regulation of translation in differentiation and development; and 2) comparative phage genomics.
Stephen Wong, Ph.D.
Stephen Wong, Ph.D.
Professor, Houston Methodist and Weill Cornell Medicine
Dr. Wong's research focuses on understanding health and disease from a systems perspective in order to generate cost-effective strategies and solutions for disease management.
Ryan Wynne, Ph.D., G2008
Professor, St. Thomas Aquinas College
Dr. Wynne’s current research focuses on understanding how hormones shape both the structure of the vertebrate brain as well as behavior.
David Zappulla, Ph.D.
David Zappulla, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Dr. Zappulla has had a longstanding interest in research questions related to transcriptional silencing, DNA replication, and the structure and function of the enzyme telomerase, which is involved in maintaining telomeres at the ends of chromosomes.